Essential Information on Ireland


Telecommunications in the Republic of Ireland, including postal services run by An Post, are regulated to a large extent by the Commission for Communications Regulation (ComReg), the Minister for Communications; Energy & Natural Resources has overall responsibility for national policy and regulation. Ireland’s entire communications infrastructure is now digital but progress in broadband technology has been stagnant since 2006.

Telephone Codes in Ireland

  • Ireland Country Code: 353
  • Arklow: 402
  • Athlone: 90
  • Ballina: 96
  • Bandon: 23
  • Bantry     27
  • Belmullet: 97
  • Birr: 509
  • Carlow: 59
  • Castlerea: 94
  • Cavan: 49
  • Clifden: 95
  • Clonmel: 52
  • Cork     21
  • Drogheda: 41
  • Dublin Central: 1
  • Dundalk: 42
  • Dungarvan: 58
  • Ennis: 65
  • Enniscorthy: 54
  • Fermoy: 25
  • Galway: 91
  • Gorey: 55
  • Kanturk: 29
  • Kilkenny: 56
  • Killarney: 64
  • Kilronan: 99
  • Letterkenny: 74
  • Limerick: 61
  • Listowel: 68
  • Longford: 43
  • Macroom: 26
  • Mallow: 22
  • Monaghan: 47
  • Mullingar: 44
  • Naas: 45
  • Navan: 46
  • Nenagh: 67
  • Newcastle West: 69
  • Northern Ireland: 48
  • Portlaoise: 502
  • Rathluirc: 63
  • Roscrea: 505
  • Skibbereen: 28
  • Sligo: 71
  • Thurles: 504
  • Tipperary: 62
  • Tralee: 66
  • Tuam: 93
  • Tullamore: 506
  • Waterford: 51
  • Westport: 98
  • Wexford: 53
  • Wicklow: 404
  • Youghal: 24

Emergency Telephone Numbers in Ireland

  • Medical: 999 or 112
  • The emergency telephone number to dial in Ireland for Fire, Gardaí (Irish Police), Ambulance, Irish Marine Emergency Service and The Mountain and Cave Rescue is 999 or 112. These numbers are to be used only in an emergency.

Banks in Ireland

  • ACC Bank
  • Allied Irish Banks
  • Anglo Irish Bank
  • Bank of America, National Association
  • Bank of Ireland
  • Bank of Montreal Ireland
  • Bank of Scotland (Ireland)
  • Barclays Bank Ireland
  • Bear Stearns Bank
  • Capmark Bank Europe
  • Citibank Europe
  • Commerzbank Europe (Ireland)
  • DePfa Bank
  • DePfa-Bank Europe
  • DZ-Bank Ireland
  • Elavon Financial Services
  • First Active
  • Fortis Prime Fund Solutions Bank (Ireland)
  • Goldman Sachs Bank (Europe)
  • Goldman Sachs Private Bank
  • Helaba Dublin Landesbank Hessen-Thüringen International
  • Hewlett-Packard International Bank
  • Hypo Public Finance Bank
  • Intesa Sanpaolo Bank Ireland
  • Irish Life & Permanent
  • JP Morgan Bank (Ireland)
  • KBC Bank Ireland (formerly IIB Bank)
  • LGT Bank (Ireland)
  • Merrill Lynch International Bank
  • Naspa Dublin
  • National Irish Bank
  • Pfizer International Bank Europe
  • PFPC Bank
  • Postbank Ireland
  • Rabobank Ireland
  • Scotiabank (Ireland)
  • The Governor and Company of the Bank of Ireland
  • Ulster Bank Ireland
  • UniCredit Bank Ireland
  • Wachovia Bank International
  • WestLB Ireland
  • State Bank of India
  • WGZ-Bank Ireland
  • Zurich Bank

Tips for  Opening Bank Account in Ireland

Having a bank account in the place where you stay is a very much essential thing. Upon arrival in Ireland as a foreign student, you will probably need to open a bank account in the country.

Irish banks need first to know who you are by checking both your identity and your residence status in the country. As a result, they will request many official papers like:

  • An attestation or a recommandation letter from your employer in Ireland.
  • Your passeport, or your national ID if you are a EEA-EU citizen.
  • Your residence permit or visa.
  • You PPS number.
  • Evidence of residence in Ireland (your rental agreement or lease).

Banks might also ask for some reference in your home country (a statement from your bank in your home country for instance). Upon presentation of the requested documents, you will be in a position to open a bank account operative within a few days.

Upon presentation of these documents, you should be able to open a bank account in Ireland within variables, but relatively short times.

According to your situation in Ireland, you may get a debit or a credit card. It's easier to get a debit card (called Laser Card) if you are already in employment in the country. However, it's more difficult to get a credit card since you don't have any credit record as a new immigrant. After a few months of residence, you may get a credit card if you receive fixed-incomes.

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